Tag: Anatomic pathology

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Anatomic pathology is about diagnosing disease through the examination of organs and tissue samples by using a microscope, or through molecular, biochemical or immunological means.

It differs from clinical pathology, where diseases are diagnosed through analyzing bodily fluids in a lab.

In anatomic pathology, a physician trained in pathology examines surgical specimens (e.g., from a biopsy). This contrasts from clinical pathology, where blood, throat cultures, and urine as sent to a lab for analysis to determine whether a patient either has or is at risk for several biological diseases.

The American Board of Pathology is one of the primary certification organizations for anatomic pathologists. To be certified in anatomic pathology, a physician must complete four years of medical school and three years of residency. To be certified in both anatomic and clinical pathology, a physician must do four years of residency.

Anatomic pathologists typically work in hospitals, and pathology in general is most times practiced in hospitals and academic medical centers, where research is being conducted.

Labs May Be Excluded from Revised Stark Law, AKS Rules

This is an excerpt of a 1,460-word article in the Jan. 6, 2020 issue of THE DARK REPORT (TDR). The full article is available to members of The Dark Intelligence Group.

CEO SUMMARY: Here are early insights about a federal compliance reform that has not gotten much attention among clinical laboratory and anatomic pathology managers. CMS

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Pathology Groups Should Plan to Use Digital Pathology

WHEN AN ANATOMIC PATHOLOGY GROUP CONSIDERS IMPLEMENTING digital pathology and whole-slide imaging (WSI) for primary diagnosis, it must identify and understand a range of challenges and opportunities.

“Every pathology group should start by considering how it will use the related technologies of a digital pathology (DP) system and whole-slide imaging,” said Liron Pantanowitz, MD, Vice Chair

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How Northwell’s Lab Team Demonstrated Value Over 10 Years

CEO SUMMARY: Among hospital administrators, the popular wisdom is that their clinical lab is a cost center. This thinking leads them to consider drastic cost-management strategies that include partnering with commercial labs to manage in-hospital lab testing and the outright sale of lab outreach programs. On the other side of this debate, innovative health system

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Is Health Price Transparency at Its Tipping Point?

Is it a coincidence that a number of uninsured consumers filed separate lawsuits in federal courts against Laboratory Corporation of America and Quest Diagnostics—alleging, in both cases, that they were overcharged for clinical laboratory tests—just months before the federal government published final rules requiring hospitals and other providers to publish their prices?

Last month, the federal Centers

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ICD-10 Gives Payers More Data About Lab Claims

CEO SUMMARY: Evidence shows that adoption of ICD-10 diagnosis codes in 2015 made it possible for health insurers to track clinical laboratory testing more closely, ask more questions about those tests, and deny coverage. Increased detail about each patient’s condition has led to increased demands for medical-necessity documentation and to denied payments of as much

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