"Lab Briefs"

Thermo Fisher, Intrinsic Bioprobes, Kaiser Permanente, UCSF, CLMA, ASCLS

THERMO FISHER BUYS INTRINSIC BIOPROBES, CONTINUES BUYING SPREE

IT’S ANOTHER ACQUISITION FOR Thermo Fisher Scientific, Inc., of Waltham, Massachusetts. It purchased Intrinsic Bioprobes, Inc., of Rochester, New York, earlier this month.

A manufacturer of immuno-enrichment and sample-preparation tools for quantitative mass spectrometry, Intrinsic Bioprobes’ products will allow Thermo Fisher to offer improved quantitative protein biomarker detection, the companies said. The Intrinsic Bioprobes portfolio includes Mass Spectrometric Immuno-assay (MSIA), a patented sample-prep technique for enrichment of low-abundance proteins in biological samples. Terms were not disclosed.

In July, Thermo Fisher acquired TREK Diagnostic Systems, a company in Basing- stoke, England, that provides systems for microbiology, blood culture, microorganism identification, and antibiotic susceptibility testing. In May, Thermo Fisher acquired Phadia, in Uppsala, Sweden, for US $3.5 billion. Phadia specializes in allergy and autoimmune diagnostics.

KAISER AND UCSF COMPLETE GENETIC ANALYSIS OF 100,000 KAISER BENEFICIARIES

DNA FROM MORE THAN 100,000 KAISER MEMBERS has been analyzed by scientists from Kaiser Permanente and the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF). The members volunteered to participate in this large genomics project.

Called the Kaiser Permanente Research Program on Genes, Environment and Health (RPGEH), the project will produce data about drug metabolism and drug response to help researchers discover genetic factors that explain differences in the way patients respond to medications. The genotyping research is being conducted with funding from a two-year, $24.8 million grant that was issued in 2009 by the National Institutes of Health (NIH).

ASCLS AND CLMA ANNOUNCE NEXT STEPS IN PROPOSED MERGER

FINAL DUE DILIGENCE IS UNDERWAY as the Clinical Laboratory Management Association (CLMA) and the American Society for Clinical Laboratory Science (ASCLS) move forward on a plan to merge the two lab organizations.

There will be a detailed review of the financials of the organizations and a review of a legal opinion on the best way to merge. If both groups decide to merge after completing these final steps, the respective boards are expected to vote on combining the two organizations in about three or four months, according to a joint statement issued on August 17.

In March, both organizations notified their members that the boards of directors had formed a taskforce to study how to combine the two groups. Called the CLMA/ASCLS Strategic Alliance (CASA), the board had five representatives from each organization. CASA is studying how the combined organization could operate in terms of programs, services, governance, culture, and mission.

Founded in 1976, CLMA has a membership of 3,000 clinical laboratory professionals. CLMA provides leadership in the clinical laboratory industry supporting laboratory professionals at any stage of their career. Formed in 1933 as the American Society of Clinical Laboratory Technicians, the ASCLS is based in Washington, D.C., and works to support excellence in the practice of laboratory medicine.

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