Individual Pathologist “Branding” Promoted by National Firms

IMPATH is latest pathology company to tout affiliation with a noted pathologist

IN THE EFFORT TO GAIN COMPETITIVE market advantage, IMPATH, Inc. of New York City publicized the recent signing of an exclusive partnership agreement involving renowned pathologist Juan Rosai, M.D., also of New York City.

Dr. Rosai has a world-wide reputation for his books, book chapters, and monographs on surgical pathology. Until recently, he was the Chairman of the Pathology Department at Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center and Professor of Pathology at Cornell University. He left to become Chairman of the Pathology Department at the National Cancer Institute in Milan, Italy.

Under terms of the agreement, Dr. Rosai will use IMPATH as his exclusive partner for analysis of biopsies and surgical specimens from U.S.-based physicians. Dr. Rosai’s existing U.S.-based business, estimated at about $1.5 million per year, will be serviced by IMPATH. Dr. Rosai will also serve as consultant to IMPATH. In that role, he will be available for diagnostic consults with pathologists, physicians, and others.

Publicize A Relationship

With this announcement, IMPATH becomes the second national pathology company to publicize a relationship with a leading pathologist. Only last July, AmeriPath, Inc. of Riviera Beach, Florida announced a services agreement with A. Bernard Ackerman, M.D., the renowned dermatopathologist. Under this agreement, AmeriPath and Dr. Ackermann were co-founding the Ackerman Academy of Dermatopathology in New York City.

“Branded Pathology”

For pathologists throughout the United States, these two developments are early evidence that a new era of “branded pathology” is about to commence. Both IMPATH and AmeriPath, as publicly-traded companies, established these relationships with famous pathologists to gain credibility, boost the quality of their anatomic pathology services, and generate new business.

THE DARK REPORT expects to see additional publicity surround the affiliation of noted pathologists with these and other pathology companies. Further, these companies will advertise their relationships with famous pathologists. This advertising should pay dividends as technology enhancements and market forces make telepathology not only feasible, but desirable.

As that occurs, famous names in pathology will have a market advantage over lesser known pathologists. It might be described as the “Drs. Cooley and DeBakey Effect,” where publicity generates more patients, which generates more publicity.

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