Tag: laboratory information systems

Sonora Quest Builds EMPI To Serve Patients and ACOs

CEO SUMMARY: Probably no state has seen a faster transition to ACOs, medical homes, and other types of integrated clinical care organizations than Arizona. Recognizing that this change created a new opportunity to add more value with clinical lab testing services, Sonora Quest Laboratories (SQL) developed an enterprise-wide master patient index. This gives SQL the

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Lab’s Patient-Centric Approach Collects Overdue Money in PSCs

CEO SUMMARY: At Sonora Quest Laboratories (SQL), the ‘Voice of the Customer’ is guiding the organization’s evolution from physician-centric to patient-centric. It was quickly recognized that an effective enterprise master patient index (EMPI) was essential. One patient-centric service that SQL is in the midst of deploying is the capability to collect overdue money owed it

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ELINCS Specifications Released in California

CEO SUMMARY: Clinical laboratories and pathology groups have a new tool to use for interfacing their LIS (laboratory information systems) with the electronic health record (EHR) systems of their office-based physician clients. It is ELINCS, an IT standard designed to support electronic lab test orders and lab test reporting. The California HealthCare Foundation sponsored the

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Pathology Group Establishes Lab Test Exchange Networks

CEO SUMMARY: After several decades of steadfastly maintaining their independence from other pathology groups in their community, progressive hospital-based pathology groups are beginning to create regional laboratory testing networks. These collaborations generally start small and often involve just a few simple testing services. In North Carolina, one pathology group has created two separate test exchange

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Seeking Market Clout, Labs Form Networks

CEO SUMMARY: Meet “Test Exchange Networks!” These are shared laboratory testing networks that have spontaneously appeared in different communities across the nation. Typically two or more local laboratories come together and begin to collaborate by sharing any number of resources. These collaborative networks can include community hospital laboratories, local pathology group practices, and even physicians’

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